Have you ever come across a mesmerizing field of lavender? It’s one of the most relaxing experiences and the smell enhances the whole experience. Growing lavender in your home or yard is a wonderful addition since the plant is known for its longevity and hardiness.

With their vivid color, lavender flowers are also wonderful in any home. Giving or receiving lavender flowers symbolizes love and appreciation. If you love lavender, there are many types to choose from, making it easy to become a collector! Read on to find out which type of lavender is best for your home.

Lavender Plant Overview

Lavender dates back about 2,500 years and is believed to have originated from the Mediterranean, Middle East and India. There are numerous uses due to its unique beauty and  lovely floral scent. Today, lavender is seen in household and bath products like candles and skincare, and can even repel mosquitos!

The name lavender comes from the Latin word “lavare,” which means “to wash.” Interestingly, Romans used lavender for their personal items such as beds, clothes and soaps, and even in their hair.

The plant is part of the mint family which has over 200 genera and more than 6,000 species, including herb plants such as thyme, rosemary and basil. The mint family also includes various shrubs and trees, as lavender is partially considered a shrub. Since lavender is related to many other herbs, its leaves and flowers are edible fresh or dried.

 

12 Types of Lavender

There are 450 varieties of lavender that are categorized into 45 different species. There is the potential of more varieties of lavender that have yet to be discovered, especially since there are a handful of hybrids. Below we’ve outlined 12 of the most recognized types of lavender that majestically cover our earth.

 

1. Ballerina, Spanish Lavender (Lavandula Stoechas)

ballerina lavender type

This French lavender has very distinct bulbs and blooms white flowers that fade to pink and purple as the plant matures. It thrives in climates with mild summers and winters. It flowers as early as May then blooms twice more in June and late summer or early fall.

  • Sun: full sun
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: mild summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 8-9

 

2. Kew Red, Spanish Lavender (Lavandula Stoechas)

kew red lavender type

This lavender gets its name from the crimson-violet flower heads that have pale pink petals on top.  It has a long flowering season from late spring to fall, and flowers can be seen year-round in mild climates.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: mild summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 7-9

 

3. Anouk, Spanish Lavender (Lavandula Stoechas)

anouk lavender type

Blooming earlier than most French lavender, the Anouk flowers from early to mid-spring and has plump deep purple heads with lighter purple petals. This lavender can also withstand hotter summers than other types.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: drought resistant
  • Climate: hot summers and mild winters
  • Hardiness zones: 6-10

 

4. Betty’s Blue, English Lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia)

bettys blue lavender type

The flowers on Betty’s Blue are quite large and colored in deep violet-blue. The plants are dome-shaped and compact. This variety of lavender has a very sweet fragrance and only blooms once in the middle of the summer. Since the flowers are so fragrant, they are usually dried and used in potpourris.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: mild summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 5-9

 

5. Lavenite Petite, English Lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia)

lavenite petite lavender type

A very unique variety of lavender, the flowers are pom-pom shaped and very dense. They are extremely fragrant with a popping light purple color. Known as one of the most beautiful strains of lavender, the plant blooms in mid to late spring. Lavenite Petite attracts many butterflies and bees.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: warm summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 5-9

 

6. Hidcote, English Lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia)

hidcote lavender type

One of the more popular types of lavender, Hidcote blooms dark purple flowers and has contrasting blue-green foliage. When this lavender is dried, the flowers keep their color, which is great for crafts and decorations. The plant blooms in late spring or early summer depending on the climate.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: warm summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 5-9

 

7. Impress Purple, Hybrid (Lavandula x Intermedia)

impress purple lavender type

This lavender is popularly used in bouquets for its bunches of dark purple flowers that are quite long. The flowers are the richest purple of all lavenders. To enhance blooming, removing faded flowers will do the trick. The lavender blooms from mid to late summer and is highly fragrant.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: hot summers and warm winters
  • Hardiness zones: 6-8

 

8. Hidcote Hiant, Hybrid (Lavandula x Intermedia)

hidcote giant lavender type

This lavender has light violet flowers that tower on long steps and spread beautifully. Hidcote Hiant is an award-winning lavender for not only its beauty but also its strong fragrance. This lavender is popularly used in bouquets. It tends to bloom mid to late summer and is a magnet for bees and butterflies.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: mild summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 5-8

 

9. Grosso, Hybrid (Lavandula x Intermedia)

grosso lavender type

Grosso is a tall variety of lavender standing at about two feet tall. The blossoms are a very dark purple with narrow fragrant leaves. This variety can withstand cold winters as low as 15ºF and can last for years if pruned directly after flowering in the late summer. Grosso is very commonly used to extract lavender oil.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: mild summers and cold winters
  • Hardiness zones: 5-8

 

10. Portuguese Lavender (Lavandula Latifola)

portuguese lavender type

Portuguese lavender, also known as spike lavender, has flowers that are simpler and more elegant than other types. The flowers produce small pale lilac bulbs in levels along the stem. This lavender is commonly used in culinary dishes and drinks. The leaves are sweetly fragrant and attract butterflies and bees.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: warm summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 5-9

 

11. Egyptian Lavender (Lavandula Multifida)

egyptian lavender type

Egyptian lavender is also known as a fern-leaf lavender due to its furry bipinnate leaves. This variety has a different smell and is less sweet than others. The plant can be ignored once established as long as the lavender is planted in well-drained soil and has plenty of room to grow. The flowers blossom in late spring.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: mild summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 8-11

 

12. French Lavender (Lavandula Dentata)

french lavender type

French lavender is more delicate in smell and color than other lavenders. The blooms last the longest out of any type of lavender, throughout the entire summer and potentially through fall. This variety is quite large and will grow two to three feet tall and wide. Another major difference is that French lavender does not tolerate extreme temperatures.

  • Sun: full
  • Water: low
  • Soil: sandy
  • Climate: warm summers and winters
  • Hardiness zones: 8-9

 

Lavender Plant Care

Most lavender requires the same type of care, including lots of sun, low watering and well-draining soil. Look over the details below for information on growing lavender indoors or planting outside. Also, see our houseplant care printables for further information.

Growing Lavender Indoors

Growing lavender indoors has quite a few different requirements. Since you will be using a pot instead of ground soil, having the correct pot size is extremely important for your plant’s health. Lavender should be planted in a pot that is only one to two inches larger than the plant’s root ball. In a larger pot, there is too much soil and the roots won’t be able to absorb the necessary water.

Being a Mediterranean plant, lavender thrives with lean soil. Lean soil can be created by filling your pot first with an inch or two of limestone gravel and then topping with a basic soilless mix. Since lavender loves the sun, placing the plant near a window is essential. Water the lavender one inch deep and only when the soil is dry to the touch. Pull back watering in the winter months.

Planting Lavender Outdoors

In colder areas, lavender should be planted in the spring and early summer. In warmer areas, lavender should be planted in early fall in order for the roots of the plant to get comfortable during the cool and moist season.

Outside, lavender grows best in low to moderate fertility soils, so it’s advised to skip spreading organic matter over the soil before planting. The plant is more likely to mature fully in soils that are neutral to slightly alkaline. Squeezing lime juice over the soil to reach a pH of around 7.0 helps with this.

When ready to plant, dig a hole that’s twice as deep and wide as the lavender plant. Lightly spread the roots if they seem to be squished. Place your lavender plant in the soil and align it with the top of the soil. Water the new lavender plant only if the rest of the soil seems to be very dry.

planting types of lavender

 

Common Lavender Questions

We all want our astonishing lavender plants to continue to grow for years to come. If you have any concerns with upkeep, here are some quick answers to frequently asked questions about lavender.

When does lavender bloom?

All types of lavender typically bloom around early to mid-summer and flowering lasts about three to four weeks with potential second or third blooms through the early fall.

Does lavender spread quickly?

All lavender grows just as tall as it does wide, about 20 to 24 inches each way. Unlike other herbs, lavender doesn’t spread as quickly. Lavender will grow to full maturity in the right conditions.

Is lavender a perennial?

Lavender is part perennial and part subshrub. This is because the lavender plant has the potential to die off when pruned. A plant is considered a perennial when it lasts for three years or more.

Can lavender survive the winter?

Lavender is a woody perennial, meaning that the plant will continue to blossom yearly, but only the stems remain through the winter. With proper pruning, lavender will last for years.

 

Lavender is a very beautiful and stunning plant that smells wonderful. Other than looking pretty and smelling nice, lavender has quite a few benefits such as improving sleep, boosting mental health and relieving pain! Incorporate lavender into your life with one of the many types or even lavender flowers. Your obsession with lavender has only begun!

 





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